Friday, August 6, 2010

Wounded Soldier Keeps Fighting for Comrades and Their Families

I'm glad that the American Forces Press Service continues to remind us of how wounded soldiers can find a road to healing and recovery. The story of Major Ed Pulido, who lost a leg in Iraq, while inspiring in its own right, underscores some of the key elements to recovery: a support group of peers with whom to share similar experiences, physical activity and challenges to restore self-esteem, and a positive attitude. There's also a mention of how military chaplains played an important role in Pulido's recovery which is inspiring to those of us in that vocation.



Retired Army Maj. Ed Pulido poses with his wife, Karen, and daughters, Kaitlin and Kinsley. Courtesy photo

‘Real Warrior’ Loses Leg, Gains New Perspective
By Elaine Wilson
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Aug. 4, 2010 – With a combat escort at front and rear, Army Maj. Ed Pulido drove a sport utility vehicle into an area of Iraq known as “IED Alley” on his way to Kirkuk from a base northwest of Baghdad.

Pulido chatted with the colonel next to him, mostly about going home again, all the while unaware of the roadside bomb lodged in the asphalt directly ahead.

The soldiers in front saw it, but it was too late to warn Pulido. The bomb detonated, and smoke, glass, noise and dust filled the air. The air bag had deployed, and Pulido shoved it to one side. That’s when he saw the damage the fragments had inflicted on his leg.

It’s been six years since that day, and more than any other moment, that one still sticks in his mind.

“I’ve had dreams about it all the time,” Pulido said. “The night sweats and terrors -- it was that moment right there when I put the air bag aside and saw the blood.”

Read the whole story here.

1 comment:

juliehuz said...

There are also great resources on this site www.realwarriors.net that include articles on building resilience, support networks and addressing common reintegration issues!

Great resource for families too!

Mad Padre

Mad Padre
Opinions expressed within are in no way the responsibility of anyone's employers or facilitating agencies and should by rights be taken as nothing more than one person's notional musings, attempted witticisms, and prayerful posturings.

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